TRaCK: Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge

Science and knowledge that governments, communities, industries for sustainable use of Australia's tropical rivers and estuaries

TRaCK provides the science and knowledge that governments, communities and industries need for the sustainable use of Australia's tropical rivers and estuaries.

Online seasonal calendar launched

Online seasonal calendar launched

Detailed Aboriginal seasonal knowledge of the Darwin region.

» View Larrakia calendar
Conceptual framework for environmental water in tropical river ecosystems

Deciding about water: NEWT

Conceptual framework for environmental water in tropical river ecosystems

go to » NEWT
Access TRaCK data via a mapping interface

Digital Atlas brings data to life

Search all of TRaCK’s research outputs from a single spatial interface

Go to the Atlas
A tool to support water allocation decisions

Management Scenario Evaluation

Rapid scenario results help planners explore and communicate trade-offs and opportunities

A tool to support water allocation decisions
Indigenous engagement

Indigenous engagement

Find out how Indigenous people are contributing to TRaCK’s body of research

Current projects
TRaCK is bringing together new knowledge about monitoring river health

Monitoring river health

TRaCK is bringing together new knowledge about monitoring river health

Find out more

Welcome to TRaCK

TRaCK (Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge) is a research hub which has drawn together more than 80 of Australia's leading social, cultural, environmental and economic researchers.  Our research focuses on the tropical north of Australia from Cape York to Broome.

Key Findings

TRaCK Research Program Overview of Key Findings

Latest news and media

The ecological health of Buffalo Creek, a tidal creek near Darwin has been severely damaged by the sewage flowing into it, researchers have found after an intense week of sampling.
Last summer’s big floods across the Gulf of Carpentaria resulted in a larger catch of banana prawns than normal for the fishers of far northern Queensland.
By hovering in a helicopter only one metre above the Fitzroy River which flows through the Kimberley in north Western Australia, scientists have discovered that underground water flows into the river where the Fitzroy meets the Cunningham River.
Three articles about TRaCK projects have been featured in the magazine, Stories of Australian Science, 2010 which was distributed to 500 delegates at the World Congress of Science and Factual Producers, held in Melbourne, 1-4 December 2009.
The value of rivers and wild food resources to Australia’s Indigenous people is the focus of new research that will help transform water management in northern Australia.
A team of river detectives has confirmed what every keen barramundi fisher knows – big floods equal big fish – and they think they know why.

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