TRaCK: Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge

Science and knowledge that governments, communities, industries for sustainable use of Australia's tropical rivers and estuaries

TRaCK provides the science and knowledge that governments, communities and industries need for the sustainable use of Australia's tropical rivers and estuaries.

Online seasonal calendar launched

Online seasonal calendar launched

Detailed Aboriginal seasonal knowledge of the Darwin region.

» View Larrakia calendar
Conceptual framework for environmental water in tropical river ecosystems

Deciding about water: NEWT

Conceptual framework for environmental water in tropical river ecosystems

go to » NEWT
Access TRaCK data via a mapping interface

Digital Atlas brings data to life

Search all of TRaCK’s research outputs from a single spatial interface

Go to the Atlas
A tool to support water allocation decisions

Management Scenario Evaluation

Rapid scenario results help planners explore and communicate trade-offs and opportunities

A tool to support water allocation decisions
Indigenous engagement

Indigenous engagement

Find out how Indigenous people are contributing to TRaCK’s body of research

Current projects
TRaCK is bringing together new knowledge about monitoring river health

Monitoring river health

TRaCK is bringing together new knowledge about monitoring river health

Find out more

Welcome to TRaCK

TRaCK (Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge) is a research hub which has drawn together more than 80 of Australia's leading social, cultural, environmental and economic researchers.  Our research focuses on the tropical north of Australia from Cape York to Broome.

Key Findings

TRaCK Research Program Overview of Key Findings

Latest news and media

The value of rivers and wild food resources to Australia’s Indigenous people is the focus of new research that will help transform water management in northern Australia.
Scientists are working with Aboriginal people in the Kimberley to better understand how the rivers and wetlands of the Fitzroy catchment have changed during people’s lifetimes.
Planning is underway to develop a Water Quality Monitoring Framework (the Framework) for the Katherine and Daly River Catchment.
Are river channels and waterholes along the Mitchell River filling up with sand and dirt? Where is this sediment coming from? And is erosion increasing?
A new summary report has been produced by TRaCK's Collaborative water planning project. It summarizes key outputs of the project so far.
Scientists coming onto Aboriginal land need to understand and appreciate the culture, history and knowledge of local people before carrying out research on country.

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