TRaCK: Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge

Science and knowledge that governments, communities, industries for sustainable use of Australia's tropical rivers and estuaries

Kimberley residents work with scientists to plan future of their waterways

Kimberley residents work with scientists to plan future of their waterways

Story available in WAV and MP3 for free download from www.track.gov.au/news

Scientists from the Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge program, better known as TRaCK, have been working together with local people living along these waterways to gain a better understanding of the biophysical, social, economic and cultural importance of their water.

The TRaCK program started in 2007 and involves more than 70 of Australia’s top scientists. It is providing the science and knowledge that governments, communities and industries need for the sustainable use and management of northern Australia’s tropical rivers and estuaries.

Three radio stories and scripts about scientists and local people’s experiences with research into the rivers and estuaries in northern Western Australia are now available for download.

Our stories focus on the human side of the research and are intended to build awareness of the program. Please feel free to air them when you like, and if you get a chance, let us know what you and your listeners think.
 

Story One:     Scientists go back to school to learn from Kimberley kids
Luke Royes from Kulkarriya Community School in the Kimberley talks about how TRaCK researchers have been visiting the school as a key part of their interaction with the local community. The researchers talk with the children about what fish they have been catching in their rivers, where the best fishing and swimming spots are, and how they value their rivers. They are also generating interest among school children to take a more active role in managing their waterways.

Story Two:    Checking out Indigenous river harvest in the Kimberley
TRaCK scientists and their local cultural adviser talk about how they have been surveying households in the Kimberley to find out more about how Indigenous people use the Fitzroy River for fishing and other activities.  This information is important for planning how rivers are used and managed so that Indigenous people can continue to use the river and also so their values are protected. The scientists talk about the importance of working with cultural advisers for the success of the research.

Story Three:    Indigenous, pastoral and government interests work with TRaCK and FitzCAM
For this story we have interviewed Indigenous leaders, a cattle station manager and a representative from the Western Australian Department of Water about how they manage and value the river, and how they see the potential benefits of the TRaCK program. All four interviewees have worked closely with TRaCK, imparting their knowledge about the Fitzroy River. They are also members of the Fitzroy Catchment Management group (FitzCAM), which is the first community-based group of its kind in the Kimberley.

TRaCK receives major funding for its research through the Australian Government’s Commonwealth Environment Research Facilities initiative; the Australian Government’s Raising National Water Standards Program; Land and Water Australia; the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation and the Queensland Government’s Smart State Innovation Fund.
For more information about TRaCK, see the website www.track.gov.au.

For more information about TRaCK:
Ruth O’Connor, TRaCK Knowledge and Adoption Coordinator, Griffith University, phone 07 3735 5094, r.oconnor@griffith.edu.au

For media assistance:
Jenni Metcalfe, Econnect Communication, 07 3846 7111 or 0408 551 866, jenni@econnect.com.au

TRaCK scientists and their local cultural adviser talk about how they have been surveying households in the Kimberley to find out more about how Indigenous people use the Fitzroy River for fishing and other activities.  This information is important for planning how rivers are used and managed so that Indigenous people can continue to use the river and also so their values are protected. The scientists talk about the importance of working with cultural advisers for the success of the research.

Story Three:    Indigenous, pastoral and government interests work with TRaCK and FitzCAM
For this story we have interviewed Indigenous leaders, a cattle station manager and a representative from the Western Australian Department of Water about how they manage and value the river, and how they see the potential benefits of the TRaCK program. All four interviewees have worked closely with TRaCK, imparting their knowledge about the Fitzroy River. They are also members of the Fitzroy Catchment Management group (FitzCAM), which is the first community-based group of its kind in the Kimberley.

TRaCK receives major funding for its research through the Australian Government’s Commonwealth Environment Research Facilities initiative; the Australian Government’s Raising National Water Standards Program; Land and Water Australia; the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation and the Queensland Government’s Smart State Innovation Fund.
For more information about TRaCK, see the website www.track.gov.au.

For more information about TRaCK:
Ruth O’Connor, TRaCK Knowledge and Adoption Coordinator, Griffith University, phone 07 3735 5094, r.oconnor@griffith.edu.au

For media assistance:
Jenni Metcalfe, Econnect Communication, 07 3846 7111 or 0408 551 866, jenni@econnect.com.au