cheap nike air max shoes cheap nike air max shoes cheap nike air max shoes cheap louboutin shoes scarpe da calcio a buon mercato so kate nike air max shoes
Research outputs now available | TRaCK: Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge

TRaCK: Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge

Science and knowledge that governments, communities, industries for sustainable use of Australia's tropical rivers and estuaries

Research outputs now available

TRaCK research outputs

Research outputs now available

Release date

12 Dec 2013

We have been harvesting our publications and outputs to provide an independent and objective source of advice for those making policy, planning and management decisions about northern Australia’s tropical rivers.

Short videos

During its synthesis year, experts from different disciplines of TRaCK’s research program were interviewed to summarise their findings. A ten minute video highlighting the overall key findings was produced, along with six shorter videos on emerging issues. Click on the links below to view the videos.

Key findings about tropical rivers
Conserving Australia’s tropical rivers
Dams for northern Australia
Land use impacts on tropical rivers
Sharing water resources in northern Australia
How do Indigenous people benefit from northern development?
Monitoring tropical river health

Facilitators’ Guide to Indigenous Water Planning

Drawing from previous TRaCK research, the experiences of the Indigenous Water Facilitator Network and the wide-ranging work done on Indigenous interests in water planning, a field guide has been developed to help Indigenous communities better understand and participate in water planning, and to aid planners in facilitating Indigenous involvement.

Download the guide or associated powerpoint modules.

Reports

A number of reports are now available:

Journal articles

New scientific publications from each of TRaCK’s research themes are now available:

Seasonal calendars

TRaCK researchers have drawn on the ecological, hydrological, meteorological and spiritual knowledge of six language groups over four years to develop a series of calendars representing Aboriginal seasonal knowledge.
    
Contact us for hard copies of any of the publications above, or browse our publications registry for more entries.